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Saturday, July 25, 2020 | History

2 edition of Furrow dike water conservation practices in the Texas High Plains found in the catalog.

Furrow dike water conservation practices in the Texas High Plains

Glen L Wistrand

Furrow dike water conservation practices in the Texas High Plains

by Glen L Wistrand

  • 73 Want to read
  • 19 Currently reading

Published by U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, [Supt. of Docs., U.S. G.P.O., distributor] in Washington, D.C .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Dikes (Engineering) -- Texas,
  • Furrow irrigation -- Texas

  • Edition Notes

    StatementGlen L. Wistrand
    SeriesTechnical bulletin -- no. 1691, Technical bulletin (United States. Dept. of Agriculture) -- no. 1691
    ContributionsUnited States. Soil Conservation Service, United States. Dept. of Agriculture. Economic Research Service
    The Physical Object
    Paginationv, 21 p. :
    Number of Pages21
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL14838050M

    “Sixty to 70 percent of producers in this area use furrow diking on several million acres,” says Scott Orr, Agricultural Group Supervisor with the High Plains Underground Water District No. 1 at Lubbock, Texas. “Farmers use furrow diking primarily on dryland, but they also use the technique with various types of sprinkler irrigation, drip. The automatic surge valves also are appealing because of reduction in labor. Researchers have found that for the clay silt soils found on the Texas High Plains, surge requires a stream size of 12 to 16 GPM for each furrow. Some experts claim that generally a stream size from 20 to 25 GPM is necessary.

      While a major reason for such a design is to retain pollutants like pesticides and fertilizers on-site, it also conserves water. Furrow-diking is another means to capture water in drier areas of the country. To furrow-dike, special equipment creates furrows with small ridges, or . exceeded recharge. Within the Texas portion of the Southern High Plains, approximately 75 percent of the irrigated area is with center pivot sprinklers, with the remaining 20 and 5 percent comprising gravity (i.e., furrow water) and subsurface drip irrigation (SDI), respectively (Colaizzi et al., ).

    In the Texas Northern High Plains the water use efficiency, which represents the units of grain produced per unit of water used by the crop, is low. Unger () reported that water use efficiency in a dryland cropping system can be doubled or even tripled if producers adopt dryland conservation . Ogallala Aquifer region of the southern Texas High Plains (THP). The To meet the DFCs, the High Plains Underground Water Conservation District adopted a 50/50 policy such that 50 % of current water in the Ogallala aquifer would remain in 50 years. This is enforced Furrow Dike Jun Mar 2-Apr Mar Furrow Dike Apr Jun 4-Jun.


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Furrow dike water conservation practices in the Texas High Plains by Glen L Wistrand Download PDF EPUB FB2

Furrow Dike Water Conservation Practices in the Texas High Plains. By Glen L. Wistrand, Natural Resource Economics Division, Economic Research Service, in cooperation with the Soil Conservation Service, U.S.

Department of Agriculture, Technical Bulletin No. Abstract Furrow diking can prevent irrigation and rainfall runoff, conserve energy. Furrow dike water conservation practices in the Texas High Plains (Technical bulletin / United States Department of Agriculture) [Glen L Wistrand] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

This study analyzes the effects of diking on water and soil conservation, crop yields, costs, and energy use in farming, using examples of farms in the Texas High Plains area.

Furrow diking can prevent irrigation and rainfall runoff, conserve energy use, prevent soil loss, amd allow producers to reclaim land otherwise unusable, depending on soil, climate, and crops grown in a given area.

" Furrow dike water conservation practices in the Texas High Plains. Save as: AGRIS_AP RIS EndNote(XML)Cited by: 4. Buy Furrow dike water conservation practices in the Texas High Plains (Technical bulletin / United States Department of Agriculture) by Glen L Wistrand (ISBN:) from Amazon's Book Store.

Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible : Glen L Wistrand. Furrow diking has been proposed as a cost effective management practice that is designed to create a series of storage basins in the furrow between crop rows to catch and retain rainfall and irrigation water.

Furrow Dikes Ordie R. Jones (Retired) R. Louis Baumhardt United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), Bushland, Texas, U.S.A.

INTRODUCTION Furrow. Mission: High Plains Underground Water Conservation District No. 1 was created in As a political subdivision of Texas, HPUWCD is charged with protecting, preserving and conserving aquifers within the District's county service area. Water Level Reports. Water level reports.

Interactive Map. Interactive map. Agendas & Minutes. of the sprinkler irrigation system. Measured data for a row crop field without furrow dikes in the High Plains Region of Texas showed that the quantity of runoff was equal to 12 percent of the gross quantity of water applied using sprinkler irrigation.

The runoff was eliminated for the same field when the furrow dikes were installed. Based on the simulation analyses, promising locations can be identified for developing furrow-dike runoff conservation practices.

Diking is a low-cost technique, and if applied properly on a long-term basis, it can result in signif- icant benefits to semi-arid by: A large amount of time and energy is expended in the extraction of irrigation water (one acre inch of water is 27, gallons in volume and weighspounds) and costs vary according to a number of variables such as type of irrigation system, irrigation efficiency, and distance the water must be trans- File Size: KB.

The dikes or basins store potential runoff on the soil surface, allowing the water to infiltrate (Fig. 1) thus, decreasing storm or irrigation runoff and increasing storage and plant available water in the soil. Furrow diking is a soil and water conservation practice that is adaptable to.

o one knows better than Texas farmers and ranchers that agriculture depends on water. Because our state is prone to drought, the lack of water often limits the pro- duction of food and fiber crops.

As a result, producers often rely on irrigation to provide sufficient water for agricultural needs. Furthermore, keeping furrow dikes in place year-round could boost yields 7 to 17 bushels per acre for sorghum and 3½ to 12¾ bushels for corn.

The practice may be useful in other areas of the High Plains to mitigate the effects of short-duration moisture stress on crop : Dave Mowitz. HPWD discontinued its printed water level report in Those who would like printed information about water levels in a specific county or counties should contact Jed Leibbrandt at () or email [email protected] HPWD Annual Report.

HPWD Fiscal Year Audit. Ogallala/Edwards Trinity (High Plains) Water Level. Basin tillage is a soil and water conservation practice that increases surface depression storage of precipitation, thereby potentially reducing storm runoff and increasing soil water storage and availability to crops.

Irrigation data from Castro and Parmer counties, Texas, [microform] / by Paul L. Rettman and Gene D. McAdoo U.S. Dept. of the Interior, Geological Survey: Open-File Services Section, Western Distribution Branch Denver, CO Australian/Harvard Citation.

Rettman, Paul. & McAdoo, Gene D. & Geological Survey (U.S.). "Furrow dikes should be an essential part of a water use efficiency program on any farm. This is a low-cost, high-return practice that can increase profitability for High Plains producers," Orr says.

Wayne Board can be contacted at or [email protected] Furrow Dike Water Conservation Practices in the Texas High Plains Glen L. Wistrand Household Expenditures for Fruits, Vegetables, and Potatoes David Smallwood and James R. Blaylock Theoretical Improvement of Autotetraploid Crops: Interpopulation and Intrapopulation Selection D.

Rowe and R. Hill A Summary of Compounds Evaluated for Plant Growth. Open Library is an open, editable library catalog, building towards a web page for every book ever published.

Furrow dike water conservation practices in the Texas High Plains Glen L. Wistrand Not In Library. Read. Ditches, dykes and deep-drainage Nigel Harvey Not In Library. Sixty to 70 percent of producers in this area use furrow diking on several million acres, says Scott Orr, Agricultural.with continuous sorghum at Etter, Texas, conservation of runoff with furrow diking resulted in a yield increase (Stewart etal., ).

Gerard et al. () found that placing a dike every m in the furrow increased sorghum yields by 11 to 17% in in the Texas Rolling Plains. Furrow diking increased cotton yields by about 35% in Donald E. Green, Irrigation Frontier on the Texas High Plains, – (Ph.D. dissertation, University of Oklahoma, ).

Donald E. Green, Land of the Underground Rain: Irrigation on the Texas High Plains, – (Austin: University of Texas Press, ). James E. Jonish, "Water Conservation Practices of the High Plains Underground Water District," Journal of the West 29 (October ).